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This is the initial application of ceiling tile rocks on the layout. I was in a hurry and just glued them together in a pile. This will deal with changing the faces to look like rocks.
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The first rockface I did was covered in an earlier article. I learned a great deal in the first attempts.
Here is the finished product. I have terraformed this end of the layout. A road has been added. The hill was made higher.
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I broke away the hardshell to add a wall of rocks at the circled area.
Click here to visit the first ceiling tile rockface article
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A piece of tile board was glued in the hole to make a mounting for the "rocks". Broken ceiling tile is glued to the this wall. There are being placed at an angle. The hills are formed when the plates are squeesed together into folds. I am representing a side view.
The key to making ceiling tile rocks is making them irregular. Break off pieces of tile about 1-1/2  to 2 inches long. The tile board should look like this example.
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The broken tiles should look like this very jaggedy. The white surface and the brown surface don't matter. That will be taken care of in carving.
Since the tiles are going on the flat surface of the wall they are cut in half. Use a sharp knife with a fresh blade. I always put a new blade and get a fresh single edge razor blade before each phase of construction. Things go smoother that way.
Break the tiles into two halves.
Use a hot glue gun to mount the tiles. Wear gloves to prevent the glue from burning your fingers. The hot glue raises a blister on the skin and sticks hot until it is pulled off.
The hot glue bonds almost instantly and makes the process quicker. It is one of my favorite scenery tools.
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Pile the tiles onto each other gluing them with the hot glue. Make the pile irregular. The shape will be adjusted later. Don't worry about the white and brown backing. Removing those surfaces makes the pile look realistic.
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Take the box cutter and distress the tiles. Blend the seams by scraping the tiles. Don't remove the excess waste that will be glued down later. Peel the white and brown off with the knife leaving the ruffed up
tile. The circled areas indicated the change. Don't put serrations representing the thin layers of rock yet.
While going to glue down the excess tile waste with a white glue solution. I grabbed what I thought was a spray bottle of wet water. Wet water has a small amount of detergent to permit better wetting. Instead I grabbed a spray bottle of Awesome a cleaning product. I sprayed it on,  and wondered why it smelled different. The ceiling tiles "decomposed". The Awesome worked wonderfully. Pure genius!
The tiles are wetted down with wet water, water with a drop or two of liquid detergent. A 30% solution of white glue and water is dribbled over the rocks to glue all the loose particles into one mass. After the glue dries add the striations and other details.
Awesome in a spray bottle
A Mini-baster and a solution of white glue and water. Fill the bottle 1/3 full of white glue and fill up with water. Shake well before using and dribble the solution on with the mini-baster.
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This is the most important step when making ceiling tile rocks. Priming them with either Zap or Kilz2 acrylic primer. This makes them waterproof. Not priming the tiles will cause problems when applying stains and finishes. The water will melt them.
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Click here to go to the next page for rebuilding the really bad end.
I use paver sand for ground cover to fill the flat spots. A latex paint is used to match that color. I have a web article about using paver sand and its varieties. Paint everything with the latex paint to give a base color. Most of this will be covered by textures and other colors.
Click here for my web article on paver sand as ground cover.
I bought a selection of earth tone craft paints, the cheap ones. Use these to color rocks. The large bottle is Black Rit Liquid Dye. It is applied as a stain at the end to bring out highlights.
Wet the rocks to make the intial coat flow on better.
I apply different colors to represent different layers of stratification. There should be definite layers in the ceiling tiles.
This is the finished rock face coloring.
This is the original horizontally layered rockface. I need to match the coloring somewhat it what is on the other side of the cut.
I have colored around this side to match the new rock surface.
The rock coloring should look like the stratification goes across the cut as a continuation.
Blend the rocks into the scenery using paver sand poured over. Brush the sand around with a soft brush.
Spray the sand with wet water and glue the sand down with the diluted white glue.
Finish the rocks by staining with Black Rit Liquid Dye diluted with water. This will bring out the texture.
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